Professor Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 1998 -2014

  • Art History
  • Sculpture

Professor Columbia University 1973-1978

  • Sculpture


Columbia University, New York, NY 

  • Doctorate Art Education - 1977
  • Master of Education - 1975
  • Master of Fine Arts - 1974
  • Bachelor of Arts, Art History - 1972

Awards: 

  • Krasnr Award for Sculpture -1985
  • Gottlieb Foundation Award - 1997
  • Columbia University Foreign Student  Fellowship - 1970


Milo's sculptures and paintings have been exhibited in galleries and museums throughout the United States, Europe, and Mexico.

Bio & Publications

Selected reviews

“The imposing quality of Lazarevic’s assembled sculpture comes not just from their monumentality (many are over eight feet tall), but also from the powerful presence of the rough embattled forms that seem to struggle for supremacy, and sometimes just for existence. The complexity of Lazarevic’s sculptures stems from both the volcanic intensity that motivates him to create and his relation to the materials with which he works.”

- Leslie Kaufman: “Milo Lazarevic: Centainty, Energy and Clarity”, Sculpture Magazine, May, 1997, p.10,11.

Sculpture exhibit, Clarck Gallery, Lincoln, MA, 1997

One-man Exhibition at O.K. Harris Gallery, New York City. Catalogue (32 pages) by Michael Levine, 1993.

International Sculpture Magazine, “Judge” by Milo Lazarevic, May/June 1986, p. 37.

One-man show at Sindin Galleries, New York City, 1982 and 1983

One man exhibition of paintings and drawings at Gallerie Marcel-Lenoir, Paris, 1981.

One-man exhibition at Sindin Galleries, New York City, 1980.
Catalogue


Exhibit with “Artist 77” at the Union Carbide Building, New York City, 1977.

Notable exhibitions

“Lazarevic creates a colony of the persecuted, and he establishes them in imaginary space. Doing so, he places them at a distance and requires his spectator to make an effort, indeed a leap. One must leap out of the ordinary, the taken for granted; and one must grasp what is not yet. That is what freedom signifies: to refuse what is and move beyond. These sculptures evoke a world that demands human freedom; they ask for a promise to change.”

- One-man exhibition at Sindin Galleries, New York City, 1980. Catalogue (18 pages) Extract from introduction by Maxine Green.

Leslie Kaufman publishes: “Milo Lazarevic: Centainty, Energy and Clarity”, Sculpture Magazine, May, 1997, p.10,11.

International Sculpture Magazine, “Judge” by Milo Lazarevic, May/June 1986, p. 37.

James Beck publishes: “Sources for Milo Lazarevic”, Arts Magazine, May 1986, p. 34.

De Liser, Carolyn, The Journal News, January 17, 1986

Bernson, Michael, “Between Drawings and Sculpture”, The New York Times, December 20, 1985, p. C-29.

Nadelman, Cynthia, Art News, September 1980, p. 247, 248.

Moser Charlotte “ The Influence of Milo Lazarevic”, Houston Chronicle, Saturday October 9, 1976, p.8, section 2.
Exhibits at the Kennedy Cultural Center, Washington, DC by invitation of the Vice President of the United States and his wife, Walter and Joan Mondale, 1982. 

One-man exhibition at the West Broadway Gallery, New York City, Catalogue by Phillips Publishing Company, 1975.

One-man exhibition at Covo de Yong Gallery, Houston Texas, 1976.

Sculpture exhibits, United Nations and Yugoslav Culture Center, New York City, 1976.

One-man exhibition at the Yugoslav Cultural Center in New York City, 1974.

Shows with the United Artist Group at the Union Carbide Building, New York City, 1974.

​First solo exhibition at Zigfield Gallery and the 14 Sculptors Gallery, Catalogue of exhibition by Sherry Luplianez, 1973.
“Lazarevic’s world of sculpture resembles the work of some unknown deity who long ago let loose a brood of ascetics from his forge. The creation of immensity by means of motion implied through suspended forms and interlocking rhythmic energy give Lazarevic’s sculpture spiritual meaning. We feel their magic, but can not touch them or engage them except in a higher transcendental level. On pages of art history, Lazarevic’s art will hold its distinction against all interpretation as well as against time.”
One-man Exhibition at O.K. Harris Gallery, New York City, 1993. Catalogue (32 pages) Extract from introduction by Michael Levine

selected reviews & publications

Milo LazarevicLink to Resume & Exhibitions